Akira Kubodera (PGSM Kunzite) passes away

  • This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

NJ_

Nebula
Oct 31, 2009
7,729
1,392
1,665
34
Wallington, NJ
#1

foenyanko

Aurorae Lunares
Sep 21, 2010
1,330
142
165
#2
WHAT?! Oh my god. That's horrifying. I'm in disbelief. Tragic. I wish it was easier/less stigmatized to get mental health help in Japan, wtf...

Rest in Peace. :sad:
 

Sakuranbo

Lumen Cinererum
Feb 10, 2019
289
218
165
#4
This is very sad news and he was a very amazing actor, plus he was so young too. Akira will be dearly missed and he will always be loved by all of his fans too. Rest in Peace.
 
Last edited:
Jul 29, 2012
4,224
1,023
1,665
#7
This is so sad. God bless him.

A different Japanese actor took his own life, too, not too long ago, because people were allegedly bullying and harassing him on social media.

People in Japan have been talking a lot about nettiquete. Nettiquete means being respectful online and treating people online exactly as you would in real life.

Prayers.
 

Rika-Chicchi

Staff member
Site Admin
May 7, 2009
37,804
1,158
1,665
#8
What a loss! RIP. m(_ _)m

There's been a number - even wave - of suicides in the Japanese entertainment industry recently, involving some big-name/high-profile, successful/on-the-rise, &/or relatively young artists, due to various or unknown reasons. :(

Suicides can be infectious like a disease.
 

MariaTenebre

Systema Solare
Jul 22, 2009
5,080
437
165
#9
This is absolutely tragic. I thought he was great as PGSM Kunzite. He definitely made the role his own and in my opinion did a truly superb job and was a great actor. As someone who has had depression and struggled with suicidal thoughts I completely empathize and sympathize with him and wish he had gotten some help instead of made this truly tragic decision. Does anyone hear know why he committed suicide?
 

Rika-Chicchi

Staff member
Site Admin
May 7, 2009
37,804
1,158
1,665
#14
An article from Variety says that the covid-19 pandemic may have contributed to a recent increase of deaths caused by suicide in Japan.
Maybe the whole world too. One of the factors is economic difficulties & pressures (not referring to Kubodera's case).
 

Maraviollantes

Sailor Moon fan #1
Staff member
Site Admin
Jan 3, 2006
9,119
464
165
Embelyon
shoujocity.com
#16
Isn't voluntarily euthanasia one of "inalienable" human rights all progressive and democratic movements so violently fight for (and win) in recent years? If the guy was living in more progressive Europe instead of old-fashioned Japan, where mental issues are stigmatized and frowned upon, he could get a ticket for assisted suicide in one of their "end of life" clinics after consultations with his mental doctor. The final result would still be the same.
 
Jul 29, 2012
4,224
1,023
1,665
#17
If Japan acknowledged that mental health is a problem and people were able to see therapists, psychiatrists, and take medications, if needed, no stigmatization, I don’t think there would even be suicides to begin with.
 

foenyanko

Aurorae Lunares
Sep 21, 2010
1,330
142
165
#20
If Japan acknowledged that mental health is a problem and people were able to see therapists, psychiatrists, and take medications, if needed, no stigmatization, I don’t think there would even be suicides to begin with.
There probably would be, though. Even if this were possible, there's still everything the person goes through while trying to find the right combination of therapies and medications. Many people feel worse on anti-depressants at first, until their brain and body adapts. As long as that often unavoidable feeling of despair before relief happens, suicides may happen. Though if the recent research about psilocybin providing instantaneous and long-lasting relief becomes a treatment, perhaps that period of time could be minimized. Though even then, there's the realities of waiting for help, or medical authorizations... There would always be risks, I think.

Euthanasia may be used in some areas, but it's typically only done after exhausting other avenues of recovery first.