Akira Kubodera (PGSM Kunzite) passes away

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Maraviollantes

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Embelyon
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#21
Euthanasia may be used in some areas, but it's typically only done after exhausting other avenues of recovery first.
Personally, I would be scared as hell to ever talk about any of my problems, mental or any other ones, with a doctor who has "assisted suicide" on his checklist of possible "treatment courses" for his patient. Even if it was at the very bottom of that checklist. Will prefer my mental issues being silenced or stigmatized any time.
 
Sep 9, 2011
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#22
This is so tragic. R.I.P. :(

Kunzite seems to be an unlucky character as far as deaths go. His seiyuu from the original anime, Kazuyuki Sogabe, passed away in 2006 from esophageal cancer at age 58, and his DiC English voice actor, Denis Akiyama, passed away in 2018 from cancer at age 66. His original French voice actor (Francois Leccia) also died in 2009 at age 60.
 
Sep 1, 2011
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Scala Ad Caelum
#23
This is so tragic. R.I.P. :(

Kunzite seems to be an unlucky character as far as deaths go. His seiyuu from the original anime, Kazuyuki Sogabe, passed away in 2006 from esophageal cancer at age 58, and his DiC English voice actor, Denis Akiyama, passed away in 2018 from cancer at age 66. His original French voice actor (Francois Leccia) also died in 2009 at age 60.
So he’s kind of in the same boat as Master Xehanort. Chikao Ohtsuka and Leonard Nimoy passed away within a month of each other in 2015, and Rutger Hauer passed away within months of KHIII’s release in 2019. Needless to say, I’m worried about Christopher Lloyd, who voiced him in Re:Mind.
 
Jul 29, 2012
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#24
Personally, I would be scared as hell to ever talk about any of my problems, mental or any other ones, with a doctor who has "assisted suicide" on his checklist of possible "treatment courses" for his patient. Even if it was at the very bottom of that checklist. Will prefer my mental issues being silenced or stigmatized any time.
That would be illegal, no doctor (at least in North America) would do that, they would go to jail.
 

Maraviollantes

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Embelyon
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#25
That would be illegal, no doctor (at least in North America) would do that, they would go to jail.
I was talking about those European countries where certain mental disorders are considered already a perfectly legal reason for assisted suicide, apparently. No worries, both US and Canada will catch up in a few years.
The point is, that modern Western psychiatry has no goal and no means to prevent all suicides. Quite on the contrary, it openly admits that in some cases suicide is the best and the only "treatment" it can provide for its patients.
 

Rika-Chicchi

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#26
The point is, that modern Western psychiatry has no goal and no means to prevent all suicides. Quite on the contrary, it openly admits that in some cases suicide is the best and the only "treatment" it can provide for its patients.
It's not just psychiatry, but medicine as a whole - the always-present limits of medical science & technology mean that we can't cure every sickness, whether physical or mental, & in such cases the patient & their relatives can decide whether to withdraw treatment, even if that could mean an instant death. As for euthanasia, it involves many possible circumstances & can't be simply said to be right or wrong by itself w/o considering the particular situation, & even so the line isn't easy to draw, as there could still be many grey areas & uncertainties in medical ethics - that's why it's always controversial.

As for Kubodera's case, we still don't even know what happened other than his death, so we can't really comment on the circumstances for his death. It's also possible that we might never fully know the reasons, if at all, nor could even the coroner's court.
 
Jul 29, 2012
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#27
I was talking about those European countries where certain mental disorders are considered already a perfectly legal reason for assisted suicide, apparently. No worries, both US and Canada will catch up in a few years.
The point is, that modern Western psychiatry has no goal and no means to prevent all suicides. Quite on the contrary, it openly admits that in some cases suicide is the best and the only "treatment" it can provide for its patients.
In Canada, it is legal (see Carter v. Canada), but the process is not as simple as you make it sound: it is a very serious legal process, two physicians and a nurse have to provide legal evidence that the patient (a) has a grievous and irremediable condition or (b) is in an advanced decline in capability and that all existing options to cure the patient have been fully exhausted. Moreover, at least two witnesses have to be present.

From a personal point of view, I strongly believe that therapy and medication are the best options and also options that have to be fully considered— I also strongly believe that society and the workplace need to be more open-minded about mental health. Quoting a doctor I know, treating not all, but certain mental disorders can be as simple as prescribing glasses for someone who cannot read. Unfortunately, society as a whole doesn’t view it that way.
 

Rika-Chicchi

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#28
Quoting a doctor I know, treating not all, but certain mental disorders can be as simple as prescribing glasses for someone who cannot read.
Yeah, & many cases actually don't need medication nor any psychiatric treatment - a consultation w/ a clinical psychologist or even a professional counsellor is sufficient. :)