Do you like drama in Sailormoon?

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Do you love drama in Sailormoon?

  • Never

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Maybe

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12

rgveda99

Lumen Cinereum
Jul 5, 2009
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Philippines
#1
Tell us some of your favorite drama scenes or how you would change certain scenes.

 

DREWdesu

Luna Nova
Sep 24, 2008
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#4
This scene itself was a really good scene by itself (in its original and dubbed forms)... gives it a whole J-Drama vibe...
BUT THE REASONS BEHIND IT ARE TERRIBLE

 

John

Luna Crescens
Dec 20, 2011
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#5
I think a story like Sailor Moon needs "drama" in order to continue, but the drama itself wasn't always incorporated in the best of ways. In the manga, it's good that we see Usagi and Mamoru's relationship get challenged, but it's not so good that it gets challenged over a little girl (wtf Usagi) and then over two lesbians (seriously?). Similarly, in the 90s anime, it was good to see Usagi and Mamoru spend some time away from each other in R in concept, but the reasoning behind it was just so appallingly bad and illogical, it makes for one of the most memorable failures (maybe the only big flaw for some people) of the 90s anime.

In contrast, the S season had some better dramatic moments. Haruka and Michiru are clearly okay with sacrificing someone to save the world/find the talismans/etc., but when we got down to it, Haruka watching Michiru basically die was quite dramatic. They also pulled off another dramatic moment at the end of Sailor Stars.

In the manga, having friends turn evil or become hypnotized happened a bit too often for it to retain its dramatic qualities, so I would say this was a failed attempt at drama -- at least after the Dark Kingdom arc.

PGSM gets a bit melodramatic near the end but I think the lighthearted moments throughout the show help to balance everything out -- for the most part.

The musicals likewise have a blend of dramatic and silly moments, but the whiplash effect is too great for me to judge their dramatic elements fairly. The sense of sequence in Sera Myu also lends itself to this inability to fairly gauge the drama of the musicals, as does the overall presentation. Some of the musicals handle drama fairly well, but the zany elements and the overall bizarre presentation makes those moments a bit obfuscated for many viewers. And I say this as a huge Sera Myu fanboy.
 
Jul 6, 2018
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#6
I disagree. I loved PGSM, but I think they lost the balance at some point - it was either goofy to the point I face palmed, or too dramatic and it lost it's way. I really think the manga did it best. I know some people found Usagi being jealous of Chibi-Usa silly, but it I read at it differently. Especially after she found out it is their daughter. As a daddy to be I have seen both me and my wife at certain times being jealous of the baby even before it is born... I know it sounds all messed up but this is a new creature both of you love from the get go with all your heart. Up until this point it used to be just the two of you and at certain points u feel like - He/ she cares aout the baby more than he/ she cares for me. It is a very difficult thing to explain... And she is a 14 year-old that has these even more than a 14 year-old intense feelings due to destiny, trying to accept there is going be someone you and your lover will love unconditionally even if it means at times. With Haruka and Michiru it is even relatable. Haruka is strong and powerful, while Mamoru still feels weak and unable to protect, while Usagi is insecured in front of Michiru's grace and talents. I like the drama in the manga, it is just there are different angles to look at it.
 

John

Luna Crescens
Dec 20, 2011
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#7
It'd be nice if the story actually gave time to develop all of those things you're talking about though. I likewise enjoy the drama in the manga but I think the story moves too quickly to really allow the drama to make a tangible effect on the reader. Everything you're saying is definitely there, but none of it seemed to really matter in the end. But that was just my experience with it.

As for PGSM...yes, there are a lot of "so goofy it's ridiculous" moments combined with "so melodramatic it's appalling" moments, but that's why I think it's balanced, lol. It goes in two extremes and for me, they cancel each other out. It would be nice if PGSM had a more consistent tone throughout the show, or if it started lighthearted and became increasingly dramatic without the mood swing effect. Instead we got a show that moves back and forth all the time. Depends on how you look at it I suppose -- I found a fair balance in its extremes, but a better balance would've been achieved if it were a a little bit more consistent.
 
Jul 6, 2018
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#8
I think the story worked the way as it is in its manga form - as a reader you are the one controlling the pace. It didn't came to nothing in the manga, all of it has been resolved and everyone learned from it and all of them were opened and honest to their feelings. The way they tried to adapt it in a dynamic medium though was wrong. You have all these facettes to a story and you didn't explore it properly... Many people blame it on Naoko, but there is no actual proof how involved she was in Crystal. She even said on multiple interviews that she wanted to develop stuff more in the manga even. I have a feeling the other parts involved didn't believed in the franchise commiting more episodes to it. If they made each arc into like 16 - 20 episodes and actually explore it more and actually do some adapting things would have worked in an animated form as well.
 
May 31, 2009
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Tankei Kingdom, Kinmoku
#9
This scene itself was a really good scene by itself (in its original and dubbed forms)... gives it a whole J-Drama vibe...
I always loved this scene. It's so well-acted and animated. Crystal could have never pulled this off.

BUT THE REASONS BEHIND IT ARE TERRIBLE
What other reason could they have come up with though? Having a villain, either Wiseman or Prince Demand, send those visions to Mamoru to break them up would be too expected and clichéd. I'm glad they didn't go that route.
 

John

Luna Crescens
Dec 20, 2011
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#11
What other reason could they have come up with though? Having a villain, either Wiseman or Prince Demand, send those visions to Mamoru to break them up would be too expected and clichéd. I'm glad they didn't go that route.
They could've gone the more "realistic" route and had Mamoru be unsure as to whether or not he wanted to really be with Usagi. In the previous season he was figuring out who he was and got swept up in his past life and his attraction to Usagi -- maybe in the second season they could've written him as wanting to explore the possibility of being his own person apart from everything else, which would maybe tie into his own uncertainties and insecurities.

But even if we ended up with a "villain trying to break up with main couple" plot, I would've preferred something like that (even if it's unoriginal) over what we ended up getting.
 
May 31, 2009
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Tankei Kingdom, Kinmoku
#12
They could've gone the more "realistic" route and had Mamoru be unsure as to whether or not he wanted to really be with Usagi. In the previous season he was figuring out who he was and got swept up in his past life and his attraction to Usagi -- maybe in the second season they could've written him as wanting to explore the possibility of being his own person apart from everything else, which would maybe tie into his own uncertainties and insecurities.
That's a horrible idea. First of all, that ship sailed with the Doom Tree arc. They couldn't just introduce this concept out of nowhere half-season in. Second, it would paint Mamoru quite unfavorably and change the entire dynamic of their relationship. It's one thing for Mamoru to drive her away because he wants to save her life and it's destroying him too in the process and another being a wishy-washy person who breaks someone's heart because of his indecisiveness and ambivalence. I highly doubt Naoko or the audience would be happy with that kind of direction. Not to mention, this wouldn't be enough to achieve the heightened drama the producers were looking for when conceiving this subplot.
 

John

Luna Crescens
Dec 20, 2011
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#14
I mean, you're free to not like the idea Sailor Starlight, but I wasn't saying "this is the best possible idea" -- I was responding to you literally asking "What other reason could they have come up with though?" I provided another reason they could have come up with, not saying "this is how I would have preferred it." If it were up to me, there wouldn't have been a break-up arc in the first place. But to get into it...

That's a horrible idea. First of all, that ship sailed with the Doom Tree arc. They couldn't just introduce this concept out of nowhere half-season in.
Obviously it might require some re-tooling of the events from that arc, but only slightly. Or rather, it might make sense given Mamoru suddenly got his memories back and now might be questioning what's real and what isn't real, etc.

Second, it would paint Mamoru quite unfavorably and change the entire dynamic of their relationship.
It would change their relationship for the better because in the end, they would decide to be together based on who they are today, not based on who they were in the past. I believe there are already hints of this concept in the story itself, but maybe an event like this would flesh it out a bit more.

And many people here will tell you that the break-up arc that exists in R as it does right now already paints Mamoru unfavorably. Some will also tell you that most of/the entire 90s anime paints Mamoru rather unfavorably. I believe one of our resident mods feels this way, lmao.

It's one thing for Mamoru to drive her away because he wants to save her life and it's destroying him too in the process and another being a wishy-washy person who breaks someone's heart because of his indecisiveness and ambivalence.
Is it wishy-washy to want to live one's own life based on how one exists in the present, unaffected by emotions from a past life? I think that's actually a rather interesting storyline, one of a maturity level slightly above that of the 90s anime. Of course by the end Mamoru will realize that he loves Usagi presently, regardless of Endymion and Serenity -- but this would present a more interesting path for him, I think.

I highly doubt Naoko or the audience would be happy with that kind of direction.
It's wonderfully presumptuous of you to assume what Takeuchi would or would not be happy with. Such a development would make Mamoru a more relatable character and give some much-needed depth to his 90s anime counterpart (and, let's be real, to his manga counterpart as well).

Not to mention, this wouldn't be enough to achieve the heightened drama the producers were looking for when conceiving this subplot.
And when they ended up executing the subplot, they really thought that "Mamoru's future self should test his past self's feelings and trick him into temporarily dumping his beloved to protect her" would result in a heightened sense of drama? Mind you, this is a story element that many fans criticize, not just me. So clearly the producers missed the mark in some capacity already.

If anything, it might make Mamoru look noble thinking he's protecting Usagi -- but it makes his future self look like a complete jerk.
 

MementoNepenthe

Aurorae Lunares
Mar 8, 2012
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#15
It's been a while since I've seen the Japanese version of R so perhaps this is only true of the DiC dub (and this may be more germane to the plot holes thread) but at least in that version, Darien's prophetic dreams merely state that the world will end if/when he and Serena/Usagi get married. Given Serena's age, that's something that shouldn't even be an issue for several years, at which point... they could just not get married, making the whole arc seem incredibly stupid. Was it different in the Japanese version?
 

rgveda99

Lumen Cinereum
Jul 5, 2009
7,936
447
165
Philippines
#16
What other reason could they have come up with though?
A jealous :setsuna: - Falls in love with ::tuxspeedmask: in the source material. Has powers to project dreams in the next season.

Though this idea would require a lot of re-write and a whole mini-arc of its own. :mudkip:
 
Jun 30, 2010
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#17
I like a little drama, but not too much.

I watch Sailor Moon primarily for the goofiness, the fun, and the formula, but I do like that there are serious dramatic moments that hit home. Of the old anime, I think Classic handled the balance between drama, suspense, action, and comedy the best, although R wasn't bad at first. At the end of the say, though, I don't want Sailor Moon to be a soap opera (which is what PGSM turned into), but a balanced show where a girl can wave a magic stick and call it a day.
 

Danzig87

Luna Nova
Dec 3, 2017
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#19
Drama isn't my cup of tea in films or series especially when it shows too much of it such as yelling and quarreling. I find it stupid, boring and sometimes unpleasant to watch. I only like melodrama when it is appropriate in some scenes of a show or movie where its main focus isn't a drama.