Poll: Do you dislike SuperS?

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Do you dislike SuperS?


  • Total voters
    32
Nov 22, 2016
877
687
665
#21
They also heavily promoted with those special episodes, OVA and the movie.

Didn't someone here posted a big drop in ratings in the latter half of SuperS? Not sure how it affected sales figures for all those merchandise.
I think they still sold like hot cakes. Sailor Moon was already some kind of Japanese Barbie at that point.
 
Likes: Starlight

Slowpokeking

Lumen Cinererum
Apr 1, 2020
426
385
165
38
#22
I'd rather watch SuperS than Stars (bar the first 6 episodes which are great and obviously more SuperS than Stars). I didn't mind ChibiUsa being the focus. I didn't mind the Outers not being there (though I definitely would've preferred to have them show up as recurring characters).

My biggest issue with SuperS is that it's so full of fillers and the pace drags along forever. I honestly loved having the inners get some love and attention again after they were somewhat ignored in S and REALLY ignored in Stars.
True, the main plot was actually ok, the trio was very well characterized, just they could probably move the plotline quicker.
 

Seen2

Lumen Cinererum
Nov 16, 2016
355
566
665
#26
You can say a lot about the slow story progression and lack of Outers, but SuperS had a very strong emphasis on it's themes. You had dreams and some fairy tale stuff, obviously, but you also had the contrast between childhood and adulthood and people's different perspectives on it.

The first half had a contrast between Chibiusa's sweet and innocent outlook on life and a relationship developing with a magic talking horse. Meanwhile you have the nightmarish Dead Moon Circus' Amazon Trio, going to bars, checking out on potential victims of the week based on how attractive they find them before going out, (attempting to) seduce them, then attacking them in a way that reminds you of sexual assault. It portrays the world of children as something pure and innocent, and the world of adults as evil, filthy, corrupt, dangerous, and without dreams. The Trio don't actually care about dreams themselves until Fisheye starts to question their existence and it sort of becomes a pretty different take on The Little Mermaid. That's what I saw the last part as, anyways.

The second half features the Amazon Quartet, all of them with a case of Peter Pan Syndrome and a child-like cruel callousness towards all the suffering they cause (except maybe JunJun in that one episode). PallaPalla in particular has a pretty sadistic streak in her, but she always treated it like a game. Unlike the Trio, they *do* have dreams and cherish them above everything else. Including the well-being of other people and even themselves. They never want to grow up because they believe becoming an adult means you'll lose your dreams. Nehelenia herself holds these beliefs to an even more extreme degree and and literally says would rather be stuck in a mirror all alone forever than give up her dream and grow up. On a side note, she refers to the Lemures, the people who's dream mirrors she devoured, as "animated corpses." I kinda wonder if Ikuhara or Enokido were trying to tell kids that people who truly have no dreams are basically zombies, not adults.

Throughout all this, the Senshi never fear growing up, never lose their dreams despite having to put them aside for their duty, never fall for Zirconia's attempt to trick them into running away to pursue their dreams by themselves (and probably act like the Quartet, if Usagi seeing a vision of the other four girls as kids before meeting her illusion meant anything). Chibiusa in particular matures quite a bit through meeting Helios and all the random people she encountered throughout the season. They're all going to grow up together and make their dreams come true together.

I'm not saying SuperS is my favorite season, that it didn't have some glaring issues, or even that they pulled off everything I described perfectly. But I do think the way it stuck to it's guns on the themes it introduced is one of it's strongest points. If you compare it to Utena, you can really see how Ikuhara and Enokido dabbled in the concepts they later explored more in the latter.
 
Last edited:

Slowpokeking

Lumen Cinererum
Apr 1, 2020
426
385
165
38
#28
You can say a lot about the slow story progression and lack of Outers, but SuperS had a very strong emphasis on it's themes. You had dreams and some fairy tale stuff, obviously, but you also had the contrast between childhood and adulthood and people's different perspectives on it.

The first half had a contrast between Chibiusa's sweet and innocent outlook on life and a relationship developing with a magic talking horse. Meanwhile you have the nightmarish Dead Moon Circus' Amazon Trio, going to bars, checking out on potential victims of the week based on how attractive they find them before going out, (attempting to) seduce them, then attacking them in a way that reminds you of sexual assault. It portrays the world of children as something pure and innocent, and the world of adults as evil, filthy, corrupt, dangerous, and without dreams. The Trio don't actually care about dreams themselves until Fisheye starts to question their existence and it sort of becomes a pretty different take on The Little Mermaid. That's what I saw the last part as, anyways.

The second half features the Amazon Quartet, all of them with a case of Peter Pan Syndrome and a child-like cruel callousness towards all the suffering they cause (except maybe JunJun in that one episode). PallaPalla in particular has a pretty sadistic streak in her, but she always treated it like a game. Unlike the Trio, they *do* have dreams and cherish them above everything else. Including the well-being of other people and even themselves. They never want to grow up because they believe becoming an adult means you'll lose your dreams. Nehelenia herself holds these beliefs to an even more extreme degree and and literally says would rather be stuck in a mirror all alone forever than give up her dream and grow up. On a side note, she refers to the Lemures, the people who's dream mirrors she devoured, as "animated corpses." I kinda wonder if Ikuhara or Enokido were trying to tell kids that people who truly have no dreams are basically zombies, not adults.

Throughout all this, the Senshi never fear growing up, never lose their dreams despite having to put them aside for their duty, never fall for Zirconia's attempt to trick them into running away to pursue their dreams by themselves (and probably act like the Quartet, if Usagi seeing a vision of the other four girls as kids before meeting her illusion meant anything). Chibiusa in particular matures quite a bit through meeting Helios and all the random people she encountered throughout the season. They're all going to grow up together and make their dreams come true together.

I'm not saying SuperS is my favorite season, that it didn't have some glaring issues, or even that they pulled off everything I described perfectly. But I do think the way it stuck to it's guns on the themes it introduced is one of it's strongest points. If you compare it to Utena, you can really see how Ikuhara and Enokido dabbled in the concepts they later explored more in the latter.
I think the biggest problem is that ppl want to see the senshi, not these random ppl's dream and too much focus were on the villains.

Ikuhara obviously went too far about it. He forgot that Sailor Moon already have a strong fanbase.

Still, the overall theme was better than Stars.