Kotono Mitsuishi Thread

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The best thing about her!

  • Her Anime Roles

    Votes: 17 27.9%
  • Her Music

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Her Looks

    Votes: 1 1.6%
  • Everything

    Votes: 43 70.5%

  • Total voters
    61

Masquerade

Solaris Luna
Nov 22, 2016
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^ It's about Anno's (the director of Evangelion) high requirement on the quality of her dubbing - she had to do many takes for cutting/pasting the ones he wanted during editing, hence feeling like doing live-action production.
It's not dubbing, though. Dubbing is dialogue replacement in post-production. What Kotono does in Japanese production is what we call "voice acting" in English.
Most countries and languages have terrible difficulties with this term, though.
Here in my country, Brazil, there wasn't much of an animation industry outside of the Monica's Gang/Monica and Friends franchise.
Now that there's a boom in recent years, voice actors working on these productions have been coming forward to say "we are doing original voicing, not dubbing" because everyone was calling them "dubladores" (dubbers). Melissa Garcia, which happens to be the official Sailor Mercury voice actress in Brazil since the R-Stars dub back in 2000, does direction for a lot of these works and is pretty vocal about that.
The interesting part is that she has been involved in Monica projects lately. And Marli Bortoletto, which voiced Sailor Moon in Classic and Queen Serenity in Eternal, has the Monica character as her first and most long-running voice acting work. :usagi:
 

Slowpokeking

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Finished, I will talk a bit about it after finishing the review.

What's the title "ことのは"'s best translation?
 
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Slowpokeking

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三石琴乃自传《琴之音》内容分享和读后感:诚挚的经验分享,为后辈铺路

My review.

It's mostly about her experience of Seiyuu, didn't talk too much about her character.

She did spend a lot of effort on Usagi, gave all herself and even got sick as we all know. Since it's a huge hit, she got to sing and do a lot of other extra works to make it more popular.

It's also a bit hard to get out of the character and break into new roles to avoid getting typecast. Misato gave her such chance.

Anno said that the Misato curl up scene in the OP was inspired by Kotono Mitsuishi's image when he saw her offwork during Sailor Moon(Classic or R). She also thanks him for seeing a different her and gave her the chance. She didn't get into the role well at first due to she wants to be mature, and later she just tried to be herself and went well.

I guess that's because Misato is not typical big sister, she had immature part deep down, later grew up but didn't forget her past. None of the other VA got even close with Misato probably due to that.

Misato probably was partly inspired by her real image. She drove motorcycle during school, could speak lively like Usagi but in truth was shy and doesn't open her trueself to ppl easily.

Too bad she didn't say much about Misato's character understanding.
 

Rika-Chicchi

Staff member
Site Admin
May 7, 2009
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^ Stealing a pic of Kitagawa Keiko's (PGSM Rei) hand-written message from your article: :p

https://i0.hdslb.com/bfs/article/32...8f70b3cef9693.jpg@792w_1245h_progressive.webp

^ She's (Kitagawa) watched Sailor Moon since she was little, & Mitsuishi is really like a princess to her. While meeting & acting w/ Mitsuishi, she was shaken by Mitsuishi's beauty, kindness to everyone, & professionalism, hence liking Mitsuishi very much. (I suppose that SD Mars is drawn by herself. lol )

It's not dubbing, though. Dubbing is dialogue replacement in post-production. What Kotono does in Japanese production is what we call "voice acting" in English.
Most countries and languages have terrible difficulties with this term, though.
Here in my country, Brazil, there wasn't much of an animation industry outside of the Monica's Gang/Monica and Friends franchise.
Now that there's a boom in recent years, voice actors working on these productions have been coming forward to say "we are doing original voicing, not dubbing" because everyone was calling them "dubladores" (dubbers). Melissa Garcia, which happens to be the official Sailor Mercury voice actress in Brazil since the R-Stars dub back in 2000, does direction for a lot of these works and is pretty vocal about that.
Thank you for your correction - yeah, I actually meant "voice acting" in that post you quoted. :)
 
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Likes: Masquerade

Slowpokeking

Aurorae Lunares
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^ Stealing a pic of Kitagawa Keiko's (PGSM Rei) hand-written message from your article: :p

https://i0.hdslb.com/bfs/article/32...8f70b3cef9693.jpg@792w_1245h_progressive.webp

^ She's (Kitagawa) watched Sailor Moon since she was little, & Mitsuishi is really like a princess to her. While meeting & acting w/ Mitsuishi, she was shaken by Mitsuishi's beauty, kindness to everyone, & professionalism, hence liking Mitsuishi very much. (I suppose that SD Mars is drawn by herself. lol )


Thank you for your correction - yeah, I actually meant "voice acting" in that post you quoted. :)
Yeah, thanks for the tranlsation, too bad she didn't talk much about Inner 4's seiyuu other than mentioned them working together for Peach Hips live show.

Fukami Rika even played Moon Princess, the final boss of the YAIBA anime and had intersting interaction with Mitsuishi's character(tried to drain her essence).

Can you read Chinese? I tried my best to write this review since most of the Chinese ppl don't know this book.

 
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Rika-Chicchi

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Yeah, thanks for the tranlsation, too bad she didn't talk much about Inner 4's seiyuu other than mentioned them working together for Peach Hips live show.
BTW, I find their group name "Peach Hips" a bit ecchi, as the butts are often seen to be like peaches in their shape over there, hence the term "桃尻" (peach butts/hips). XD

Can you read Chinese? I tried my best to write this review since most of the Chinese ppl don't know this book.
Yeah, I can, & thx for writing that review. :)
 

Slowpokeking

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BTW, I find their group name "Peach Hips" a bit ecchi, as the butts are often seen to be like peaches in their shape over there, hence the term "桃尻" (peach butts/hips). XD


Yeah, I can, & thx for writing that review. :)
Yeah, it's a bit weird. They were allowed to sing SM songs but not cannot use Sailor Moon's title, so they invented this name.

Thanks! Also thank this forum for letting me know about this book.
 
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Slowpokeking

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Anyone else bought this book? Since I couldn't read Japanese, I might miss/misread some stuff. Translate software is not 100% reliable. I only asked my friends about a few paragraphs.
 
Nov 16, 2016
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「自分を守る防御力を上げなきゃいけなかった」卵巣摘出、結婚の破談…セーラームーン役・三石琴乃の“波乱万丈すぎる人生” | 文春オンライン

A really good, in depth article about Kotono Mitsuishi's new book, her struggles in life (mostly her hospitalization, among other things), and her legacy was published the other day. It also touches on Sailor Moon's reputation quite a bit. My understanding of Japanese is just basic weeb-level, but I'll try to translate it with DeepL and Google and touch it up to be readable without making any big guesses.


"I had to raise my defenses to protect myself."
Ovary removal, marriage breakup... Sailor Moon actress Kotono Mitsuishi's "too-eventful life."


Page 1:
It has been several years since Billie Eilish, the charismatic figurehead of Generation Z, showed up at a nationally watched music event wearing an original outfit with a large print of Usagi Tsukino from "Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon."

It is not unusual for international celebrities like Taylor Hill to upload their Sailor Moon cosplay appearances on social media, and it's also well known that figure skater Medvedeva performed a show in which she took off her Sailor uniform and transformed into a Sailor Guardian cosplay while the Japanese song "Moonlight Legend" was played during an exhibition.


"In the name of the moon, I'll punish you!" As the famous line from Sailor Moon and Kotono Mitsuishi's voice played in the background, the image of Medvedeva posing on the ice rink was more than a little strange to watch. This is because it was unforeseeable 31 years ago, before the original broadcast, that the Japanese anime "Sailor Moon" would be so popular among foreign women in the 21st century, where many American movie heroines are strongly projected with feminist ideals.

"Five girls fighting in miniskirts...?"

One story illustrates how Sailor Moon was viewed prior to its airing.

In the manga "I Thought I Was Going to Die, H Uncensored," manga artist Keiichi Tanaka recalls his days as an employee of a major toy manufacturer, when the head of the planning department was approached with a project to sponsor Sailor Moon and was told, "This is no good! Sailor suits and mini-skirts...only male otaku would appreciate such a thing! We only do anime that elementary school girls like." Although the comic mentions "S*ilor M**n," it is an anecdote that shows how the anime was viewed before it was broadcast.

It wasn't just sponsors and toy manufacturers. In a trilogy in the May 1993 issue of Animage, Anno Hideaki said in front of Sailor Moon staff members Sato Junichi and Ikuhara Kunihiko, "'Sailor Moon' is good. It's really good. But when I heard about the story of five girls fighting in miniskirt sailor suits before it started airing, I thought, 'What a scandalous product!*' Kunihiko Ikuhara, who also directed the show, replied, "Me too. When I first heard about the project, I thought, 'Is this a joke!? A beautiful girl in a sailor suit and a miniskirt fighting an army of handsome men? That just sounds like a cabaret show!'"

(*The translators gave me several different words for this quote, both positive and negative, including "rip-off of a product," "cunning product," "deceptive product," "blah product," "mockery of a product," "blah product," "brilliant product," and so fourth. Considering the context of the article, I'm assuming he meant it in a negative way.)
Page 2:
In an interview with Oricon, Fumio Osano, the editor in charge of Nakayoshi, the magazine in which the original manga was published, recalled that the ratio of male to female readers and fans at the time was 4:6, "I was surprised at this ratio," as expected. He recalls that the work was "well received by men," which was unusual for a work aimed at girls at the time. It is also true that the work was "accepted by male otaku," as many doujinshi for men were published at the time.

 But on the other hand, Brie Larson, who starred in the acclaimed "Captain Marvel," a film that embodies a feminist message, says she went home to watch Sailor Moon and did not want to miss a single second. Director Domee Shi, who created the CG animation "Turning Red" at Pixar, also reveals that she was greatly influenced by Sailor Moon during her adolescence, posting a hand-drawn illustration of the characters titled "The Other Guardians of the Galaxy."

Sailor Moon does not fit into the value system asserted in some recent social networking sites that "sexual representations that please Japanese male otaku and works that empower girls and female creators overseas are always in opposition and never compatible."

Why was Sailor Moon so popular with both young girls and otaku? Kunihiko Ikuhara, who directed Sailor Moon, made an interesting statement in the Animage trilogy mentioned above.

"Kotono Mitsuishi's voice came in and I was like, 'Oh, so that's what this is!'"

Ikuhara: When I heard about that project, most people seemed to think that it would be like "Cutie Honey" (cool and sexy). I thought it would be like that too, but Mr. Sato said, "No, it's not like that." When I looked at the storyboard for the first episode that Mr. Sato drew, I couldn't understand what was "different" about it. Then the colors were added, the sound was added, and Kotono Mitsuishi's voice was added. I was like, "Oh, so that's what this is!"

Anno: The first episode was great.



Ikuhara: It encapsulates what "Sailor Moon" is all about.
Kunihiko Ikuhara, who would later work on "Revolutionary Girl Utena," speaks here of a "difference" that is difficult to explain in critical language, a subtle sense and nuance that can only be conveyed through colors, sounds, and the voice of the seiyuu. However, the true essence of a visual work is in the expression that appeals to the audience's subconscious, such as the voice of the voice actor, where the real message emerges.

"When Kotono Mitsuishi's voice came in, I was like, 'Oh, so that's what this is!"' Kunihiko Ikuhara did not clearly verbalize in the trilogy what the "difference" was that he noticed. However, it was probably a difference that many viewers, including girls and otaku, keenly sensed at the time and could not put into words.
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Emergency hospitalization, marriage breakup... Mitsuishi's tumultuous life.

In March of this year, voice actress Kotono Mitsuishi published an autobiographical book titled "Kotonoha," in which she looks back on her life as a voice actress. In it, of course, she talks about her early departure due to emergency hospitalization, which is inevitable when talking about "Sailor Moon" at that time.

In the final episodes of Sailor Moon's first season, she was hospitalized in an emergency due to a perforated ovarian cyst, forcing her to leave the show at the most critical time. In "Kotonoha", she recounts how her engagement was called off while she was recuperating from her oophorectomy.

But it is a quiet retrospective from Kotono Mitsuishi, now married to another partner and a mother in the 21st century. In her first book, "Tsuki Hoshi Taiyo (Sun Moon Stars)," published in 1995 and written separately from her serialized recollections in the monthly magazine Newtype, "Hospital Diary: 302,400,000 Seconds of the real Kotono." It contains words spewed by Kotono Mitsuishi in her twenties as if she were slamming them down.

There, although under a pseudonym, she confesses to her emotional conflicts and separation from her fiance, the hurt caused by the words of his mother, and even the date and time of the wedding that was originally scheduled for. May 30, 1993. Just after Sailor Moon's popularity exploded.

Perhaps the fact that it's now only available second-hand and hasn't been made into an e-book is because it is so graphic that it wants to be quietly retold in today's language. I'll avoid directly quoting everything written there, but when the doctor in charge says, "I'm old-fashioned and I want my wife to stay home," she writes, "That's not fair. That's just egotistical. What about the position of women who have worked hard at their jobs?" Her confession that she was hurt by the words of her boyfriend's mother, "I don't exist only to have babies!," were unusually bare "honest" words for a young female voice actress in the midst of the idol voice actress boom of the time, when even the existence of a boyfriend was a cause of controversy.

3,024,000 seconds. That is the number of seconds for the five weeks that she was off Sailor Moon. Three weeks of hospitalization and two weeks of recuperation.

Misato Katsuragi with "The pain of a woman."

Hideaki Anno comments on her latest book, "Kotonoha." The short essay reveals an anecdote about how the figure of Misato Katsuragi in the OP sequence of "Neon Genesis Evangelion" was inspired by the image of Kotono Mitsuishi, who "sat alone in the tatami room and floated around outside the drinking party" at a tavern after the recording of "Sailor Moon R the Movie."

“'When someone talks to her, she becomes cheerful like Usagi-chan, but when the conversation ends, she becomes withdrawn,' I thought,” writes Anno.

Misato Katsuragi, who is kneeling down in the OP, is depicted as someone with two faces: one as an older sister who cheerfully and uninhibitedly says, "Service, service!", and the other as a realistic modern woman who is hurt by society and the establishment.
While Yoko Takahashi's "Cruel Angel's Thesis" is playing, overlapping with face of the main character, Shinji Ikari, the silhouette of Misato Katsuragi appears nodding and holding her knees before looking up. It's a simple and brilliant animation that expresses the concept of the work, depicting the body and spirit, loneliness and loss of a woman living in a near-future city. Perhaps Anno Hideaki got this motif from Kotono Mitsuishi, who has experienced loss both physically and mentally.

Misato Katsuragi, who she played at the same time as Usagi Tsukino, also became a character adored by both men and women.
Page 4:
Sailor Moon aired from 1992 to 1997 and Evangelion from 1995 to 1996.
During this period which she appeared in representative works that caused a social phenomenon in the mid to late 90s,
Kotono Mitsuishi had to deal with the scarring from surgery to remove one of her ovaries, as well as the emotional scarring in her personal life, which she later described as "like I fell and scattered everything I treasured on the ground."

"I had to get my defenses up to protect myself."

Another thing that Kotono Mitsuishi once talked about was the stalker damage she experienced during the voice actor boom of the 1990s. In an interview for the mook book "Seiyu Premium" published in 2017, Kotono Mitsuishi said that during the voice actor boom after Eva, "There were times when I was followed from the studio to the apartment where I lived alone, and I received unnerving letters from the office. The office didn't protect me 24 hours a day, so I had to raise my defenses to protect myself outside of the workplace," she says.

This experience is shared by many female voice actresses of the same era. Junko Iwao, who co-starred with Kotono Mitsuishi as Hikari Hokari in "Neon Genesis Evangelion," also describes in her autobiographical essay "voice: Koe no Tsubasa" how she was the victim of a severe stalker who "always had someone waiting for her in front of her house." She also describes an experience she had as a member of an idol group before she became a voice actress, when she was almost forced to undress for a photo shoot.

In "Kotonoha," Kotono Mitsuishi does not talk about her stalker victimization in the 1990s. Instead, she notes that during her time at her training school, she was treated unequally as a student by her instructor, who was also a voice actor at the time, and that she often saw "inappropriate relationships" in the power dynamics that emerged between instructors and students.

"For those of you who are thinking about becoming a voice actor, this may not be what you want to hear. However, you may be unlucky enough to find yourself in an unequal relationship in the future. You may feel outrage and disgust because of unreasonableness. You have to protect yourself from power harassment and sexual harassment. If you cannot solve something alone, please talk to someone and let it out," she says.

To "ruin the industry" as an idol seiyuu...

In "Kotoha," Kotono Mitsuishi writes, "On the other hand, there were those who said, 'This is the generation (Mitsuishi's generation) that ruined the industry.' (omission) Although it was unintentional, we may have caused such a negative effect." It's a sentiment that reveals the complex feelings of the first generation of idol seiyuu.

However, as I read interviews with Kotono Mitsuishi and Junko Iwao, I felt that because they were among the first generation of idol voice actors, their sense of the hurt and pain of being consumed as idols was also deeply rooted within them.
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Last year, a documentary film titled "Sono Koe no Anata e" was released. The film looks back on the voice acting industry in the early days of Japanese animation, along with the life of Kenji Utsumi, the voice actor who portrayed Shenron in "Dragon Ball" and Raoh in "Fist of the North Star." It includes old footage of the first generation of voice actors marching in protest, including for improvements in their working environment.

Today, Kotono Mitsuishi and Junko Iwao talk about their experiences, and Megumi Ogata, who is of the same generation, expresses her concerns about the "invoice system"* on social media, perhaps indicating that the older generation that has been responsible for such activities have passed the baton on to them.

*(I have no idea what "invoice system" could possibly mean, so I left it as-is.)


The first generation of idol seiyuu know both light and shadow.

In a long interview with Hisashi Maeda for Mapion News, Kotono Mitsuishi, who touched on the subject of the Covid pandemic, was asked, "Just as you have learned from your teachers and seniors, do you mean that you are going to pass on your knowledge to the next generation?" In response to Maeda's question, Kotono answered with a reserved "I don't think I'm that much of a self-promoter."

It is true that her position as a freelance actor without an office is not strong in the Japanese entertainment industry. However, today, characters played by Kotono Mitsuishi are almost all in blockbusters, such as Eva and Sailor Moon, Hancock in "One Piece" and Rena Mizunashi in "Detective Conan." There is even a jinx that says, "Works with Mitsuishi Kotono in them will be long-runners."

And not only as an anime voice actor, but also as a live-action actor, after "Rikokatsu," he is scheduled to appear in next season's historical drama "Hikaru Kimi e" (To You, Hikaru). Last year there was "Haken Anime!" and Mamoru Miyano's appearance in the morning drama "Ranman." Young voice actors are making inroads into live-action dramas, and Kotono Mitsuishi's appearance in a historical drama will also be a big story. Just as she took over the role of Nobita Nobi's mother from her predecessors, I believe that she will not only take over the role, but also the role of the oldest generation.

Is "Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon" a Pretty Girl or a Guardian? Is Japanese anime sexual consumption or empowerment?

Kotono Mitsuishi and the rest of the first generation of idol voice actors have lived through an era in which these two sides were blended together, and they know both the light and the dark sides of this mixture, which cannot be categorized in one way or another.

The editor in charge at the time, Mr. Osano, continued, "I was surprised to find that 40% of Sailor Moon's readership was male. When the remake was produced in the 21st century, the returning fans were 90% female."

The term "first penguin" describes the first one to jump into dangerous waters where sharks may be present in search of fish. Kotono Mitsuishi, who was among the first to jump into the rough waters of the idolization of the voice acting world and is now taking on another major drama, may one day begin to spin words for her juniors who will follow in her footsteps.

"I've heard that the vocal cords are the organs most resilient to age." "I hope to do this job until I become a grandma."

Kotono Mitsuishi says these in the interview with Hisashi Maeda mentioned above. Whatever the years ahead bring, perhaps the time will come when the voice that has played characters that reached both men and women will one day recount the era in which she lived to her fans and pass on a message to the future.

Perhaps someday then, when the "first Usagi in the world to become Sailor Moon" begins to speak, the Usagi Tsukinos and her friends around the world will answer aloud, and Misato Katsuragis of all generations will smile and nod.
 

Slowpokeking

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「自分を守る防御力を上げなきゃいけなかった」卵巣摘出、結婚の破談…セーラームーン役・三石琴乃の“波乱万丈すぎる人生” | 文春オンライン

A really good, in depth article about Kotono Mitsuishi's new book, her struggles in life (mostly her hospitalization, among other things), and her legacy was published the other day. It also touches on Sailor Moon's reputation quite a bit. My understanding of Japanese is just basic weeb-level, but I'll try to translate it with DeepL and Google and touch it up to be readable without making any big guesses.


"I had to raise my defenses to protect myself."
Ovary removal, marriage breakup... Sailor Moon actress Kotono Mitsuishi's "too-eventful life."


Page 1:


Page 2:


Page 3:


Page 4:


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I don't think most of it was in the book.

She didn't talk much about Sailor Moon franchise, the harassment part was also covered by like 1-2 lines.
 
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Jawshx

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The editor in charge at the time, Mr. Osano, continued, "I was surprised to find that 40% of Sailor Moon's readership was male. When the remake was produced in the 21st century, the returning fans were 90% female."

They say that as if that wasn’t their marketing strategy from the get go. They purposefully alienated the male fan base by almost exclusively targeting to women. And while I have no problem with them honing in on their target demographic (it is a shoujo manga, after all) I’m not sure I really find the marketing for Crystal that empowering, anyway (Make up, expensive shoes, handbags..! Is this really what the hardcore female Moonies want?) They also should realize that Sailor Moon has a huge LGBT following but they always seem to ignore that side of things, too.
 

Slowpokeking

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The editor in charge at the time, Mr. Osano, continued, "I was surprised to find that 40% of Sailor Moon's readership was male. When the remake was produced in the 21st century, the returning fans were 90% female."

They say that as if that wasn’t their marketing strategy from the get go. They purposefully alienated the male fan base by almost exclusively targeting to women. And while I have no problem with them honing in on their target demographic (it is a shoujo manga, after all) I’m not sure I really find the marketing for Crystal that empowering, anyway (Make up, expensive shoes, handbags..! Is this really what the hardcore female Moonies want?) They also should realize that Sailor Moon has a huge LGBT following but they always seem to ignore that side of things, too.
It's very clear since Sailor Moon has serious main plot of fighting.

I don't think they care about LGBT group that much.

Or let's say, they treat them with equality, not specialty.
 
Aug 16, 2014
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It's very clear since Sailor Moon has serious main plot of fighting.

I don't think they care about LGBT group that much.

Or let's say, they treat them with equality, not specialty.
I think the thing is sailor moon was always gear towards a female demographic.So it probably was surprising for them.To see a male audience.Its like totally spies .The crew was surprise that it was male that like it as well.
 
Aug 16, 2014
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The editor in charge at the time, Mr. Osano, continued, "I was surprised to find that 40% of Sailor Moon's readership was male. When the remake was produced in the 21st century, the returning fans were 90% female."

They say that as if that wasn’t their marketing strategy from the get go. They purposefully alienated the male fan base by almost exclusively targeting to women. And while I have no problem with them honing in on their target demographic (it is a shoujo manga, after all) I’m not sure I really find the marketing for Crystal that empowering, anyway (Make up, expensive shoes, handbags..! Is this really what the hardcore female Moonies want?) They also should realize that Sailor Moon has a huge LGBT following but they always seem to ignore that side of things, too.
Yes, because most our women.They are most likely to like feminine products.I can see them like high designer shoes and make up.
 

Slowpokeking

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I think the thing is sailor moon was always gear towards a female demographic.So it probably was surprising for them.To see a male audience.Its like totally spies .The crew was surprise that it was male that like it as well.
Also the anime was more like shojo anime, so it's not a big surprise.

Yes, because most our women.They are most likely to like feminine products.I can see them like high designer shoes and make up.
The manga was more female targeted, Crystal mostly follows it.
 

Slowpokeking

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庵野監督から「違う、もうちょっと若かった」…腰が砕けるようなダメ出し受けた三石琴乃がつづる挑戦への心構え

――「エヴァ」シリーズで長くミサト役を演じ、劇場版は昔のテレビシリーズと演じ分けようと考えていた?

写真・根本好伸
 新劇場版の収録のとき、葛城ミサト役は、私がそれまでに培ったもので取り組もうと思ってしゃべったんです。そうしたら庵野秀明監督に「違う。もうちょっと若かった」とか、腰が砕けるようなダメ出しをたくさんもらって(笑)。そこからテレビ版の芝居を目指そうと切り替えました。やはり監督が求めるものイコール観客が求めるものだろうなと。ただ、新劇場版「破」の新しいストーリーに入ってからは、感じたままに取り組みました。「破」は楽しかったな。

Anyone mind help translate it? Software doesn't seem to work well.